Tag Archives: Obstruction of justice

garlicfriesandbaseball:

scales of justice 2GFBB Note: Craig Calcaterra who penned this post is a lawyer and has some really interesting comments on this case. Example: “…..the fact is, Bonds was asked a yes or no question and he answered “no.   And ” It is not the job of the criminal justice system to punish an evasive or non-responsive witness”.  If you’ve been following this case you’ll like this article.

Originally posted on HardballTalk:

Barry Bonds lawyers will head into court today to argue his appeal of his obstruction of justice conviction today. There will be no decision today because that’s not how appellate courts roll, but when you read the Bonds headlines later, that’s what it’s about.

To review: Bonds was acquitted on all counts of perjury, but convicted for obstruction of justice. The basis for that conviction: a rambling answer to a question about whether anyone besides team doctors ever injected him with anything. His initial answer was something incoherent about being a “celebrity child.” Prosecutors and the jury say that that answer was “intentionally false, misleading and evasive.”

What no one ever seems to mention, though, is that Bonds actually answered the question:

source:

 

As I’ve said before: maybe that “no” is lie. Probably is in fact. But the jury didn’t agree, acquitting him on that very question with respect to the perjury…

View original 444 more words

Bonds and Steroids ~ Impossible to Defend.

I’d like to talk about the obstruction of justice charge, not just in the Barry Bonds case, but about the charge in general as it’s used in our judicial system.   For example take this hypothetical situation in a court setting:

Question:  “What did you find out?”

Answer:  “I found out I didn’t find out anything.”

Question:  “Oh yah?  How did you find that out?”

Answer:  “I don’t know.”

Evasive answer?  Maybe.  Maybe not.   But after  years of investigation, interviews,  personal vendettas and dumpster diving, the prosecutors in the Barry Bonds perjury trial  ended up with obstruction of justice being the only charge that the jury found fit to find Bonds guilty of.

Our system is seriously flawed folks.  What does obstruction of justice mean?  It sounds to me like it means if, for whatever reason, the jury can’t find the defendant guilty of anything else, they can always charge him with obstruction of justice – meaning the defendant got in the way of a conviction on one or more of the other 75 charges.

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