Tag Archives: Pitcher

This Day in History …… Designated Hitter 10th Man On

“December 10, 1972The American League adopts the designated hitter rule on a trial basis for three years.”  Forty years later we’re still stuck with it.   Whether you like the DH or not pretty much depends on which league your favorite team plays for. 

cartoon- scared baseballI’m a bit obsessed with this designated hitter thing.   I mean why not have a designated catcher that doesn’t have to do anything except “catch”.  Once the opponent has a runner on third, the DC can step in and take the hits for the regular catcher as the runner heads for home , thereby assuring the regular catcher’s safety.  The next inning, or maybe even the next play, the regular catcher can resume his position at the plate.

I tackled the subject earlier this year when I wrote about it based mostly on fact, but also with a tad bit of emotion:

“The official rules of Major League Baseball, Rule 1.01, states clearly:

Baseball is a game between two teams of nine players each …..”

I’ve been trying to wrap my arms around the designated hitter since it was first introduced by the American League back in 1973, but Official Rule, 1.01, that first rule of baseball, keeps getting in the way.    The Designated Hitter Rule got thrown into MLB Miscellany as an official rule which states that a hitter may be designated to bat for the starting pitcher  in any game.   This came about in 1973 and the “any game” thing meant not only the American League but also the National League.

This was news to me.  I never realized the National League had a choice in the matter.  But for some reason I can’t explain I’ve always thought the National League to be just a little superior in that they played the game with nine players as the game was originally intended to be played,  not with the ten players the AL chose  to protect their prima donna  pitchers from getting a little ruffled.”

I can’t imagine any scenario that would allow me to wholeheartedly accept this notion.  If anyone has any ideas, other than you’re trying to protect the pitcher, I’d like to hear them.   It’s rather like a sacred cow you know, and it’s one of the  reasons I find the National League just a little superior to the American League.  

zoe at the ballparkOkay then.  I got that off my chest this morning.  Wonder what’s in store for the rest of the day?

“Happy Birthday Zoe!”

Pitching 101 – Tim Lincecum Video

I’m currently on vacation so hope you like this video I downloaded a few months ago.  This might  be of interest to those of you who are pitchers, want to know about pitching or just curious as to how those guys can do all the stuff they do.  It’s educational and I hope you’ll find it as interesting as I did.

One of the more astounding statistics is that of Juan Marichal comingled in with the others.  You’ll understand what it means once you view the video.

Casey at the Bat …… “The Response”

On August 16, 2010, I posted a blog about “Buster at the Bat ….” talking about Buster Posey, but referencing that wonderful old poem, Casey at the Bat.   It’s as popular now as it was when it was  first published in The San Francisco Examiner on June 3, 1888.   A friend thoughtfully supposed the reason the poem is still so loved is because the same emotions, rivalries and competitive spirit are as relevant today as when it was first written.    I found this wonderful sequel to “Casey” at the Baseball Almanac .   “Casey’s Revenge” , written 18 years after Casey at the Bat, is an answer to the rivalry between the legendary pitcher who started all the trouble and Casey.   Believe it or not, it’s almost as fun as the original.  Here, see what you think  ~

Casey’s Revenge by Grantland Rice ©
Published: The Speaker (06-1907)
There were saddened hearts in Mudville for a week or even more;
There were muttered oaths and curses- every fan in town was sore.
“Just think,” said one, “how soft it looked with Casey at the bat,
And then to think he’d go and spring a bush league trick like that!”
All his past fame was forgotten- he was now a hopeless “shine.”
They called him “Strike-Out Casey,” from the mayor down the line; Continue reading